8.6 Other Pictish Stone Sites North of Inverness

Other Pictish stone sites

Explore the history of the Picts along the east coast from Inverness northwards.

Trail highlighting 17 sites with Pictish stones, ranging from Inverness to Dunrobin near Golspie.

The catalogue lists all the stones in the museum’s collections. A useful introduction to Pictish symbols

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery has a collection of Pictish stones dating mainly from the 6th-8th centuries. See museum website for visiting times

The museum houses 15 Pictish stones dating from the 8th century onwards. The main exhibit is an elaborate 8th or 9th century cross-slab. It is a Class 2 stone which means it is carved in relief with a mix of Pictish and Christian symbols. Many of the designs are similar to those used in Pictish metalwork. See museum website for visiting times

An essay by Pictish Art expert Isabel Henderson.

A Victorian museum in the grounds of Dunrobin Castle with a collection of more than 20 Pictish stones including class 1 symbol stones and class 2 cross-slabs. See Castle website for visiting times.

Other Pictish Stones in Scotland

This site contains more information on the history of the Picts and their culture.

pictish symbol © Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
 
 
   
  • Dunadd Fort, Argyll.
     

    8.1 Tarbat Discovery Centre, Portmahomack

    Between 1994 and 2007 archaeologists excavated an area around the church of St Colman at Portmahomack on the tip of Tarbat Ness. They discovered an extensive monastic settlement dating from the late 6th century.

  • Dunadd Fort, Argyll.
     

    8.2 Hilton of Cadboll

    The cross-slab at Hilton of Cadboll is a replica of the stone which originally stood here. It was carved in 2000. The land-facing back of the stone is a copy of the original stone which is now in the Museum of Scotland.

  • Dunadd Fort, Argyll.
     

    8.3 Shandwick

    The cross-slab stone at Shandwick is covered with Christian symbols. This is an expression of Pictish Christianity rather than being a stone which combines pagan and religious designs.

  • Dunadd Fort, Argyll.
     

    8.4 Nigg Stone

    The Nigg Stone is one the finest carved Pictish stones. It was carved around 800AD - or perhaps earlier - and is covered in Christian symbols.

  • Dunadd Fort, Argyll.
     

    8.5 Craig Phadraig

    Craig Phadraig is a wooded hill on the edge of Inverness. Follow the path up the hill to discover the possible remains of King Brude’s fort.

  • Dunadd Fort, Argyll.
     

    8.6 Other Pictish Stone Sites North of Inverness

    Explore the history of the Picts along the east coast from Inverness northwards.